16 Of The Best Places To Eat & Drink In Mexico City (CDMX)

With new restaurants opening on a constant basis, Mexico City’s food scene is moving at an accelerated pace. And we’re very much here for it!

If there are two words to describe what it was like eating and drinking our way through Mexico City, they’d be: utter joy. Each dish or drink was artistic, messy, refreshing, greasy, innovative, smokey…the list goes on. In a capital full of life, colors and growing urban development, here are some of the best places to eat and drink throughout CDMX. If you think you love Mexican food, get ready to truly dive even deeper into love.

Tipping!

Don’t forget, there’s at least a customary 10% tipping required when you receive the bill.

Pujol

Tennyson 133, Polanco, Polanco IV Secc, Miguel Hidalgo, 11550 Ciudad de México, CDMX, Mexico

Pujol is chef Enrique Olvera’s vision to create a gastronomic haven – a contemporary perspective regarding Mexican traditions and heritage. Its signature baby corn dish is theatrical from start to finish: glazed with coffee and costeño chilli, dramatically served inside an empty pumpkin followed by a mystical puff of smoke. The savory sauce is also made from mashed chicatana ants mixed into the coffee-mayonnaise sauce. Don’t miss the cactus sorbet, the sweet acidity stems from a touch of chamoy. Pujol is absolutely THE ultimate fine-dining experience in Mexico City.

Pujol
PHOTO WENDY HUNG
Pujol
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Pujol
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Pujol
PHOTO WENDY HUNG

Maximo

Av. Álvaro Obregón 65 Bis, Roma Nte., Cuauhtémoc, 06700 Ciudad de México, CDMX, Mexico

My favorite restaurant has to be Maximo, the farm-to-table bistrot might showcase hints of European and Japanese influences but the ingredients are completely grown locally in Mexico. The restaurant opens with an air of transparency, a revealing kitchen warmly welcomes patrons to take a peek at chefs in action. The stone crab tostada was wonderfully transformed into a delectable contrast of crispy and creamy. Meanwhile, the beef tongue in “mole de olla” is drenched in a dark and sexy sauce, each bite melted like butter in my mouth.

Maximo
PHOTO WENDY HUNG
Maximo
PHOTO WENDY HUNG

Contramar

Calle de Durango 200, Roma Nte., Cuauhtémoc, 06700 Ciudad de México, CDMX, Mexico

One of the best seafood restaurants in Mexico City might just be Contramar, where a scallop tostada and grilled octopus can do more than satiating any foodie’s appetite. The menu solely features items that are freshly caught every day, so each dish arrives in the hands of the chefs as pure as it can be. Today, Contramar is one of the trendiest restaurants in the city, with an open-air outdoor made for any time of the day.

Contramar
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Contramar
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Contramar
PHOTO WENDY HUNG

Handshake Speakeasy

C. Amberes 65, Juárez, Cuauhtémoc, 06600 Ciudad de México, CDMX, Mexico

Don’t expect a Piña Colada to arrive in a creamy, tropical glass. As one of the best bars in CDMX, HANDSHAKE SPEAKEASY’S spin on a traditional cocktail is, in fact, translucent. Minimal and utterly tasty. To the naked eye, it appears like a Gin & Tonic. It’s clear, HANDSHAKE does things unexpectedly. Consistent motifs that resonates in the bar’s wide-range of cocktails are: clarification, holistic simplicity, clean aesthetics while emanating an explosion of tastes. READ MORE How HANDSHAKE Bar Became The Best Speakeasy In Mexico City (CDMX).”

Must Try Cocktails in Mexico City
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El Turix (Taquería El Turix)

Av. Emilio Castelar 212, Polanco, Polanco III Secc, Miguel Hidalgo, 11540 Ciudad de México, CDMX, Mexico

Want to taste tacos and panuchos that’ll make you want to dance? If you find yourself in Polanco and ready for a casual quick bite, then don’t miss mouthwatering panuchos at El Turix. The Mexican dish originated from Yucatán is essentially a crispy refried tortilla stuffed with chicken, pickled red onion, refried black beans and every heavenly goodness one can imagine. There’s nothing better than standing on the side of the street fainted by mouthfuls of panuchos. Ultimate happy place.

El Turix
PHOTO WENDY HUNG
El Turix
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El Turix
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Churrería El Moro

Multiple locations

Churros at Churrería El Moro is a must! Despite that churros did not originate from Mexico – but rather, Spain and Portugal – they’re now wildly popular throughout the country. Pair it with a warm cup of cafe de olla (Mexican spiced coffee) and there’s the perfect combo of sweetness and autumn vibes.

El Moro churros
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El Morro churro
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El Moro churros
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Chilpa

C. Chilpancingo 35, Colonia Condesa, Cuauhtémoc, 06170 Ciudad de México, CDMX, Mexico

Chilaquiles are divine all on their own, but having chilaquiles for breakfast is a bowl of savory paradise. The traditional Mexican dish comprises of corn tortillas cut into smaller triangles, slightly fried or baked. Then, green or red salsa are drenched over the tortillas. Various ingredients are added, like: chicken, cream, avocado, onions…etc. But having it for breakfast or brunch means that an egg on top gives this popular dish some extra gooey goodness. Head to Chilpa in Condesa for this splendid dish.

Chiquadilles
PHOTO WENDY HUNG

Filigrana

Av. Veracruz 62, Roma Nte., Cuauhtémoc, 06700 Ciudad de México, CDMX, Mexico

The word Filigrana, or filigree, refers to a technique used in artisan jewelry making by weaving various figures with fine gold threads. In the same manner, this Filigrana restaurant in Roma Norte embroiders through fine flavors, aroma, and textures. Its entire menu highlights an exquisite narrative that weave braid from guacamole with broad beans, insect salt, and martajado corn tostadas to a modern mole of pot with roast strip, and miniature vegetables. In Filigrana, chef Martha Ortiz gives us a traditional Mexican and artistic landscape that translates to a complete delight in sensory.

Filigrana
PHOTO WENDY HUNG
Filigrana
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Filigrana
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Street food

I have simply one word for Mexican street food: undeniable. Every morning, I walked outside of our building and smiled at the vendor who sold tamale, sandwiches, and coffee. He knew I’d want to try a different kind of tamale each day, so he’d wrap it up in a to-go plastic bag. Then, I’d walk a few more feet, approaching a juice stand to choose a different type of fresh smoothie that I hadn’t already tasted the morning prior. There are numerous vegetables and fruits packed in one plastic cup that I can only recognize them by colors. Yellow, green, orange. All are healthy and merely 30 pesos each.

One street food I profoundly fell in love with was esquites, or corn in a cup. Typically made with white corn kernels either boiled or soaked in salted water, then sauteed in butter and onion. Once it’s served in a cup, other ingredients are added: lime juice, hot sauce, cheese, mayonnaise, or chili powder. Devouring it on-the-go, by the spoonful makes it one tasty afternoon snack.

street food
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