7 Restaurants In Vilnius For Traditional Lithuanian Cuisine

Get ready for Lithuania’s iconic three B’s: beets, berries…and bacon!

Eating your way through Vilnius can be a hearty throwback to Finland; expect abundant berries, potatoes, and beets. Let’s not forget, lots and lots of pickles. Products made for harsh climate in the north can be filling, but traditional Lithuanian cuisine – similar to that of Latvian and Estonian – traces back to German and Polish roots.

First things first, stumbling upon a warm cup of joe every morning won’t be a challenge. Coffee culture in Vilnius is especially prominent, thanks to the city’s dense student population. On one single street in Old Town, there can be as many as five coffee shops. Each exudes a different vibe with unique décor.

Additionally, bacon-flavored food items seem to be a local trend. Bacon ice cream, smoked bacon schnapps, bacon-flavored wheat crisps…can all be found in various eateries. For fans of these salt-cured pork, it might just be time to expand your taste buds even more.

Of course, there are numerous trendy spots serving Italian and French cuisine in this capital city, but what’s the fun in that? Here’s a list of restaurants in Vilnius highlighting traditional Lithuanian dishes. Gero apetito!

Ertlio Namas

Šv. Jono g. 7, 01123 Vilnius, Lithuania

Arguably the best restaurant in Vilnius, Ertlio Namas celebrates historic cuisine that dates back to the 14th and 15th centuries. In those eras, dukes and duchesses believed “you are what you eat,” hence diners will find neither pork nor chicken on the menu since they were considered weak animals, particularly chickens were consumed solely by farmers during this time.

Upon arrival of each plate, a waiter explains the history and story behind every exquisite dish. With either 4 or 6-course set menu available, it’s clear that Ertlio Namas is meticulously intentional by integrating the past and present in an upscale setting while remaining true to Lithuanian heritage.

Ertlio Namas VILNIUS
Ertlio Namas. PHOTO WENDY HUNG
Ertlio Namas VILNIUS
Ertlio Namas. PHOTO WENDY HUNG
Ertlio Namas VILNIUS
Ertlio Namas. PHOTO WENDY HUNG
Ertlio Namas VILNIUS
Ertlio Namas. PHOTO WENDY HUNG
Ertlio Namas VILNIUS
Ertlio Namas. PHOTO WENDY HUNG
Ertlio Namas VILNIUS
Ertlio Namas. PHOTO WENDY HUNG
Ertlio Namas VILNIUS
Ertlio Namas. PHOTO WENDY HUNG

Mykolo 4

Šv. Mykolo g. 4, 01124 Vilnius, Lithuania

Named by St. Michael the Archangel, or patron of the people, as well as the alley which the restaurant is located; Mykolo 4 is a family-run institution featuring 19th century bourgeoisie cuisine in Vilnius. The interior space is classically elegant which pairs beautifully with a drink menu full of exclusive wines (like the traditional white fruit berry wine) and a house special: natural mead – honey fermented alcohol from ancient times. Don’t forget to try fried pig ears, dumplings, and beet ice cream.

Mykolo 4 VILNIUS
Mykolo 4. PHOTO WENDY HUNG
Mykolo 4 VILNIUS
Mykolo 4. PHOTO WENDY HUNG
Mykolo 4 VILNIUS
Mykolo 4. PHOTO WENDY HUNG

Senoji trobelė

Naugarduko g. 36, 03228 Vilnius, Lithuania

A famous stop for traditional Lithuanian cuisine is Senoji trobelė where you’ll want to load up on potato pancakes, cepelinai (potato dumplings,) and cold borscht (beet root soup.) The cottage-like restaurant welcomes patrons with an airy outdoor patio, wander inside and you’ll camp at one of many wooden tables and chairs that transport an authentic dining experience to a snowy winter night by the fireplace, sipping on local beers and pungent brandy.

Senoji trobelė VILNIUS
Senoji trobelė. PHOTO WENDY HUNG
Senoji trobelė VILNIUS
Senoji trobelė. PHOTO WENDY HUNG
Senoji trobelė VILNIUS
Senoji trobelė. PHOTO WENDY HUNG
Senoji trobelė VILNIUS
Senoji trobelė. PHOTO WENDY HUNG
Senoji trobelė VILNIUS
Senoji trobelė. PHOTO WENDY HUNG

Lokys

Stiklių g. 8, 01131 Vilnius, Lithuania

A different kind of traditional fare, Lokys is also a Lithuanian restaurant in Old Town, operated by a second-generation family that is truly passionate about sustaining historical cuisine. Not only is Lokys the oldest family-run restaurant in Vilnius, the building itself was originally built at the end of the 15th century. Ot once served as a living quarter and a trading house. Throughout the centuries, it shifted from shops to pubs to taverns. Today, this medieval cave serves historic lagers and ales, as well as foods favored by ancient folks, including: venison meat roasts, beaver meat stew and boar meat roast.

Lokys VILNIUS
Lokys. PHOTO WENDY HUNG
Lokys VILNIUS
Lokys. PHOTO WENDY HUNG

Etno Dvaras

Pilies g. 16, 01124 Vilnius, Lithuania

Situated in the heart of Old Town, Etno Dvaras is a favorite among tourists but it’s also simply a cozy spot not only with easy access to most landmarks, but its menu also showcases Lithuanian classics: herring, fried breadsticks with cheese dip, beet root soup, wild mushroom soup in a bread bowl, blood pudding…and much more. Just the potato dumplings alone, there are 14 options available to choose from: fried, with meat, meat-stuffed…just to name a few.

Etno Dvaras VILNIUS
Etno Dvaras. PHOTO WENDY HUNG
Etno Dvaras VILNIUS
Etno Dvaras. PHOTO WENDY HUNG
Etno Dvaras VILNIUS
Etno Dvaras. PHOTO WENDY HUNG

Šnekutis

Šv. Mikalojaus g. 15, 01133 Vilnius, Lithuania

This is now a vital stop for travelers. Known as a pub serving real beer, Šnekutis’ kitchen also serves up delicious Lithuanian dishes: potato dumplings, fried cod, pig ears and feet. At night, the bar/restaurant turns into a buzzy spot, especially for foreigners eager to taste a wide variety of craft beers. From a cold IPA to a darker stout, Šnekutis is where you can take endless cherry shots with friendly bartenders.

Šnekutis VILNIUS
Šnekutis. PHOTO WENDY HUNG

Halle Market

Pylimo g., 01136 Vilnius, Lithuania

One of the best places to shop for groceries and local produce in Vilnius is certainly the Halle Market, or Halės Turgus, located in Old Town. It is the oldest and largest market in Vilnius, originally constructed in 1906 by architect Vaclovas Michnevicius. The 8,400 square meter indoor space is home to fresh fruits, vegetables, cheese stands, cured meats, bakeries…and much more. The marketplace is the hub of its own butchery, and abundant organic products, making it one of the best places to learn about Lithuanian food culture.

Halle Market
Halle Market. PHOTO WENDY HUNG
Wendy Hung

CEO, FOUNDER, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

As the founder of Jetset Times, Wendy is an avid traveler and fluent in five languages. When she's not traveling, Wendy calls Paris and Taipei home. Her favorite countries so far from her travels have been: Bhutan, Iran, and St. Bart's because they were all so different!

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