Verona’s Charm: Lamberti Tower, Juliet’s House & Castelvecchio

My favorite part, however, was its adjourning bridge, offering a great view of the castle, the river, and the city itself. It’s all very rustic, and it still feels authentic, which is part of Verona’s charm.

VERONA
PHOTO BECKY CHAO

From the top of the Lamberti Tower, you can see all of Verona. It is very similar to Venice (not surprising since the city voluntarily joined the Republic in 1405) with all those quaint buildings squeezed together with tiny crooked alleyways running through them.  Verona’s view is magnificent – so worth the climb (238 steps, a real workout for those of us with a fear of rickety, old lifts). You can see the faded coral of the rooftops, the vivid green trees on the mountains surrounding the city, and the bright, fluffed clouds on a clear day. It is amazing to think that this was all built centuries ago, dating back to the prehistoric age even, but it still thrives today.

Perhaps the most popular attraction is Juliet’s house, suiting as Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet takes place in this city. A small, three-story building with mismatched bricks, it is lovely, and you can even stand on Juliet’s balcony, imitate the famous scene: “O Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?” There is even a statue of Juliet, and we are told to grab her breast for good romantic luck. Inside the house, there is not much; in fact, it does not appear to be lived-in and the house bears no true connection to Shakespeare’s work. However, there is huge romantic value placed on the house, as there are many couples visiting, reenacting the scene, and even attaching a love lock of their own to the gate adorned with overcrowded, bright, colorful locks.

VERONA
PHOTO BECKY CHAO

Verona is a refreshing change from the popular tourist destination of Venice, and it is only at Juliet’s house that you’d encounter such hordes of tourists. Elsewhere, there are not quite as many people. It feels a bit like an abandoned city, and in a way, it is. Sometimes, you can encounter excavations that reveal the Roman ruins underneath the modern city, see its uneven roads and mismatched cobblestones. There is even a castle from the 14th century, Castelvecchio, along the river Aldige. The castle itself is now a museum of art, notable for its medieval sculpture and Renaissance paintings. My favorite part, however, was its adjourning bridge, offering a great view of the castle, the river, and the city itself. It’s all very rustic, and it still feels authentic, which is part of Verona’s charm.

Article written by Becky Chao.

VERONA
PHOTO BECKY CHAO

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